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House of Arras wins ‘Best Sparkling Trophy’ at every capital city wine show

House of Arras wins ‘Best Sparkling Trophy’ at every capital city wine show



A huge congratulations to Accolade Wines’ House of Arras for winning the ‘Best Sparkling Trophy’ at every capital city wine show in Australia this year!

Ed Carr (pictured above), senior House of Arras Winemaker, is celebrating this phenomenal set of wins after the final results of the Royal Hobart Wine Show and the National Wine Show in Canberra over the weekend.

“These awards have topped a superlative year for House of Arras. Such endorsement across a broad range of judges is an absolute statement of quality and the entire viticulture and winemaking team is extremely proud of this achievement,” says Carr.

“It is particularly pleasing to be awarded 'the home state’ trophy for the ‘Best Tasmanian Wine’ in Hobart from a field of strong competition across many premium cold climate wine styles.”

The seven trophies were split between the House of Arras Grand Vintage 2008, which took home three trophies and Blanc de Blancs 2008 which received four.

Last week, House of Arras also received the ‘Best Australian Producer’ Trophy at the prestigious International Wine & Spirit Competition, making it the first time that the top Australian producer trophy has been awarded to a sparkling wine brand.

With these accolades under his belt, it’s no wonder that wine critics have dubbed Carr the “Godfather of Australian Sparkling”.

“It is absolutely fantastic to see our philosophy of fastidious viticulture and winemaking come to fruition and receive these awards from such discerning wine judges in recognised quality competitions both here in Australian and overseas,” said Carr.

The entire portfolio of Arras sparkling wines is held back between 3-10 years to give them the distinction, quality and maturity they require to be world-class.


Which one would you choose?

“What sets House of Arras apart from other Australian sparkling wines on the market is the age of its wine,” says Carr.

“There are plenty of cold climate sparkling Chardonnays, Pinot Noirs and Pinot Meuniers, but to take it to world parity, it had to be the same age as benchmark wines and that’s what we are achieving."

In addition to the trophy winning Grand Vintage 2008 (RRP $79.99) and Blanc de Blancs 2008 ($86.99), the House of Arras (Wine) portfolio includes a Brut Elite (RRP $50), Rosé 2006 ($86.99) and the E.J. Carr Late Disgorged 2003 ($189.99) which won ‘Best Wine of Show’ at the Australian Sparkling Wine Show this year.

The official list of House of Arras’ Wine Show Trophies 2017
Royal Queensland Wine Show (July) – Best Sparkling Trophy ‘House of Arras 2008 Grand Vintage’
Royal Sydney Wine Show (August) - Best Sparkling Trophy ‘House of Arras 2008 Grand Vintage’
Royal Perth Wine Show (September) - Best Sparkling Trophy ‘House of Arras Blanc de Blancs 2008’
Royal Adelaide Wine Show (September) - Best Sparkling Trophy ‘House of Arras Blanc de Blancs 2008’
Royal Melbourne Wine Show (October) - Best Sparkling Trophy ‘House of Arras 2008 Grand Vintage’
Royal Hobart Wine Show (November) - Best Sparkling Trophy ‘House of Arras Blanc de Blancs 2008’
National Wine Show – Canberra (November) – Best Sparkling Trophy ‘House of Arras Blanc de Blancs 2008’
The Australian Sparkling Wine Show (October) - Wine of Show ‘House of Arras 2003 EJ Carr Late Disgorged’
International Wine & Spirit Competition (November) - Best Australian Producer Trophy

Ed's advice to retailers on how to sell more Aussie sparkling

Ed Carr discusses the rise of Aussie sparkling in the latest issue of drinks trade. Here's what he had to say to Hannah Sparks: 

What are the trends in Australian sparkling currently?

We are seeing a decline in the budget end of the Australian sparkling market, but there’s strong growth in the premium end. The  fact that Australia is a huge market for Champagne means that people  are prepared to spend hard earned money on good quality product. So  if the quality of Australian sparkling moves up - which I think it has, particularly in the last five years or so - there are reasons for people to invest in the category.

How can the trade help to get more Australian sparkling into consumers’ glasses?

Show people; share your knowledge and get consumers to taste it. I think it’s an education process to show how good those wines can be.

What do you think are the key selling points for Australian sparkling versus international sparkling?

I don’t see it as a competition. A lot of people like to ask which one is best, but I don’t really see it like that. I’d like to see people’s purchase being driven on quality and price, so it comes back to label rather than country of origin. There is a lot of very good Australian sparkling and I think ours sits up fairly well in that field.

What’s needed to continue to improve the reputation of Australian sparkling?

If you look at vintage Champagnes, the current releases are mostly ‘08s and ‘09s; there are not many Australian wines that have that level of age on them. It’s pleasing to see that quite a few more Australian sparkling labels are moving towards aged releases, but if we want to be perceived as being at a similar level of complexity and depth on a global basis, we’ve got to get to a similar age.

Click here to read more from Ed 

 

 


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